Eating yourself for lunch, unpalatable but becoming essential

Eat yourself thinI always enjoy Steve Denning and his writing. He has been discussing the fundamental changes taking place within the management of our organizations. Just go over to the Forbes site for Steve’s articles http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/

Also just take a read of “Why Is Corporate American Eating Itself Alive?” about how Corporate America is practising self-cannibalism, triggered by Dennis Berman in an article in the Wall Street Journal with a message that resonates more and more today “isn’t it time we stop according extraordinary compensation to Corporate America’s leaders for meeting their quarterly numbers through the short-sighted tactic of self-cannibalism, and instead focus business on its true goal of adding value to customers with investments and innovation in real products and services?” More destruction as against enlightenment or simply exposing themselves to a very thin core, leaving themselves totally vulnerable?

Steve preaches radicalism simply because he sees the fundamental changes taking place, setting in train a new set of social and economic changes. He points out we are creatures of habit but being delivered more and more is his “better, faster, cheaper, smaller, lighter, more convenient and more personalized,” and we tend to say, “Hey! Yes! I want that! And not only do I want it. I want it now! In fact, not only do I want it now. “I’ve got to have it now!”

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For whom the bell tolls

I read two short articles over this weekend. One was entitled “Avoiding Innovation’s Terrible Toll” written by Spencer E Ante, published in the Wall Street Journal (http://on.wsj.com/zJ9IIT ) and the other by Jeffrey Phillips “When executives talk about innovation, watch out” in his innovate on purpose blog here (http://bit.ly/wpaqWu)

I felt the heavy sound of the bells tolling away coming through both articles and it reminded me of For Whom the Bell Tolls a famous novel by Ernest Hemingway.

The first was the sad demises of Kodak

If you have not seen the day of Revolution in a small town where all know all in the town and always have known all, you have seen nothing.- For Whom the Bell Tolls

Rochester may not be the ideal place to live, the headquarters for Kodak but it was the place that thousands of people earned their living by being associated with Kodak. They worked there, they supported it in the community, and they mostly benefitted from it. What saddens me of course is that they at Kodak did not have that ability to react to such dramatic changes within their industry. Continue reading